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Monday, November 9, 2020 | History

4 edition of Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans found in the catalog.

Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans

Brian Duncan

Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans

  • 211 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Mexican Americans.,
    • Intermarriage -- United States.,
    • Ethnicity -- United States.,
    • Americanization.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementBrian Duncan, Stephen J. Trejo.
      SeriesNBER working paper series ;, working paper 11423, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online) ;, working paper no. 11423.
      ContributionsTrejo, Stephen J., 1959-, National Bureau of Economic Research.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHB1
      The Physical Object
      FormatElectronic resource
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3478387M
      LC Control Number2005618401

      the negative relationship between human capital and intermarriage rates for Mexican Americans along with the finding that children with intermarried parents are less likely to be identified as Mexican to suggest that observed measures of intergenerational progress for Mexican Americans may be biased. Card et al. () use intermarriage rates as a. Explores processes governing the ethnic identification of second and later generations of Mexican immigrant descendants using the Latino National Political Survey. Ethnic identification arises directly from cultural continuity and lower levels of assimilation, experiences with ethnic competition, and a combination of both processes. Experiences with discrimination and darker Cited by:


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Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans by Brian Duncan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Intermarriage Brian Duncan, Stephen J. and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans book Trejo. Chapter in NBER book Mexican Immigration to the United States (), George J.

Borjas, editor (p. - ) Conference held FebruaryCited by: Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans Using Census and CPS data, we show that U.S.-born Mexican Americans who marry non-Mexicans are substantially more educated and English proficient, on average, than are Mexican Americans who marry co-ethnics (whether they be Mexican Americans or Mexican immigrants).

Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans Brian Duncan Department of Economics University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box Denver, CO () [email protected] Stephen J.

Trejo Department of Economics University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station C Published: Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans, Brian Duncan, Stephen J.

Trejo. in Mexican Immigration to the United States, Borjas. Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these. Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo, "Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans," NBER Chapters, in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pagesNational Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Get this from a library. Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans.

[Brian Duncan; Stephen J Trejo; National Bureau of Economic Research.]. Mexican Immigration to the United States: Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans Article (PDF Available) October with 47.

Get this from a library. Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans. [Brian Duncan; Stephen J Trejo; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- "Using Census and CPS data, we show that U.S.-born Mexican Americans who marry non-Mexicans are substantially more educated and English proficient, on average, than are Mexican Americans.

The Diffusion of Mexican Immigrants during the s: Explanations and Impacts David Card and Ethan G. Lewis 7. Ethnic Identification, And unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans book, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans Brian Duncan and Stephen J.

Trejo 8. Impacts of Policy Reforms on Labor Migration from Rural Mexico to the United States. 7 Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans 8 Impacts of Policy Reforms on Labor Migration from Rural Mexico to the United States 9 Emigration, Labor Supply, and Earningsin Mexico.

Search results - of Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans "Using Census and CPS data, we show that U.S.-born Mexican Americans who marry non-Mexicans are substantially more educated and English proficient, on average, than are Mexican Americans who marry co-ethnics (whether they.

Duncan, Brian, and Stephen Trejo. “Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans.” In Mexican Immigration to the United States, ed. George Borjas, – Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Google ScholarCited by: "Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans," IZA Discussion PapersInstitute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo, "Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans," NBER Working PapersNational Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. 5. Mexican Immigration and Self-Selection: New Evidence from the Mexican Census Pablo Ibarraran and Darren Lubotsky 6.

The Diffusion of Mexican Immigrants during the s: Explanations and Impacts David Card and Ethan G. Lewis. Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans Brian Duncan and Stephen J Price: $ To investigate the role that intermarriage plays in the intergenerational transmission of human capital and ethnic identification for Mexican Americans, Duncan Brian, Trejo Stephen J.

Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans. In: Borjas George J., editor.

Mexican immigration to the United by: 1. Introduction. The United States is, once again, in the midst of an age of immigration.

Inthere were 40 million foreign-born persons living in the United States (Grieco et al. ).Of the million international migrants in the world in —defined as persons living outside their country of birth—almost one in five were residents in the United States (UN Population Author: Charles Hirschman.

Selective Ethnic Attrition and the Intergenerational Progress of Mexican Americans nature of intermarriage and ethnic identification, some of the most successful descendants of Mexican.

We investigate whether selective intermarriage and endogenous ethnic identification interact to hide some of the intergenerational progress achieved by the Mexican-origin population in the United States. In part, we do this by comparing an “objective” indicator of Mexican descent (based on the countries of birth of the respondent and his parents and Cited by: The diffusion of Mexican immigrants during the s: explanations and impacts / David Card and Ethan G.

Lewis ; 7. Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans / Brian Duncan and Stephen J. Trejo ; 8. Impacts of policy reforms on labor migration from rural Mexico to the United States /.

Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans / Brian Duncan and Stephen J. Trejo Impacts of policy reforms on labor migration from rural Mexico to the United States / Susan M. Richter, J.

Edward Taylor, and Antonio Yunez-Naude. Professor Karen Leonard's study of one of California's more interesting multi-ethnic communities, founded at the turn of the 20th century by Hindu, Moslem and Sikh men from India's Punjab region and their Mexican-American wives, is a well-researched look into how different immigrant cultures meld to become American, while retaining some ethnic Cited by:   Abstract.

This chapter presents some of the exceptional characteristics of recent Hispanic immigration to the United States. Inthere were nearly 40 million Hispanic immigrants and descendants of Hispanic immigrants living in the by: 6 The Diffusion of Mexican Immigrants During the s 7 Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans 8 Impacts of Policy Reforms on Labor Migration from Rural Mexico to the United States.

|t Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans / |r Brian Duncan and Stephen J. Trejo -- |g 8. |t Impacts of policy reforms on labor migration from rural Mexico to the United States / |r Susan M.

Richter, J. Edward Taylor and Antonio Yunez-Naude -. The percentage of Mexican-Americans receiving welfare assistance is only about _____ that of whites. one-half The Los Angeles __________ riot in began over conflicts between Mexican residents and some sailors on leave.

Panel on Hispanics in the United States, Committee on Population, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Duncan, B., and Trejo, S.J. Ethnic identification, intermarriage and unmeasured progress by. Intermarriage is common among U.S.-born Hispanics. Thirty-five percent marry someone who isn’t Hispanic. About 12 percent of Hispanic men and 15 percent of Hispanic women born in the U.S.

married a Hispanic person who was born outside the U.S. Foreign-born Hispanics are much less likely to marry a non-Hispanic. This book addresses why some ethnic minority migrant groups have better economic and political integration outcomes than others.

The central claim is that social integration leads to trade-offs with economic and political : Rahsaan Maxwell. Ethnic identification, intermarriage, and unmeasured progress by Mexican Americans. In Mexican immigration to the United States, ed. Borjas, George – Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Google Scholar | CrossrefCited by: 6. Ethnic identity of Mexican American children under the current socio-political climate was studied. Mexican American children were expected to display symptoms of ethnic ambivalence and self-rejection.

Using the Kenneth and Mamie Clark () Brown doll/White doll experiment as a model, data were gathered using a mixed model. This approach combed Author: Adrian James Tan. The frequency of intermarriage between Mex-ican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites has in-creased substantially from about 19% in to 29% in (see Table 1).

At the same time, the percentage of Mexican Americans marrying other Mexican Americans has declined from 77% to 66%. These two trends are clearly related; the question is how. Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans,” (). Fertility: The Role of Culture and Family Experience,”Author: Hoyt Bleakley and Aimee Chin.

Focusing on Mexican-American and Puerto Rican populations in Chicago, Latino Ethnic Consciousness documents the development of the a collective Hispanic or Latino ethnic identity, distinct and separate from the national and cultural affiliations of Spanish-speaking groups. Author Felix Padilla explores the internal dynamics and external conditions, which have prompted this Cited by:   Another finding that has fueled much of the recent discussion about Latino self-identification is a study from the Pew Research Center earlier this year showing that million Americans changed their self-identified race and ethnicity from “Hispanic and some other race” in the census to “Hispanic white” in the census.

Social cohesion in destination countries is an increasingly important issue due to the multiethnic structures in these countries and due to ongoing international migration. Union formation of individuals across different backgrounds can be seen as an indicator of social cohesion. However, this phenomenon is important not only in the case of first generation migrants but also for their Cited by: 3.

Focusing on Mexican-American and Puerto Rican populations in Chicago, Latino Ethnic Consciousness documents the development of the a collective Hispanic or Latino ethnic identity, distinct and separate from the national and cultural affiliations of Spanish-speaking groups.

Author Felix Padilla explores the internal dynamics and external conditions, which have prompted this/5. “Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans.

3 thoughts on “See prescient warnings about immigration, which we ignored”. The authors address topics of acculturation and the development and socialization of ethnic minorities—particularly Mexican-Americans.

They stress the roles of social and behavioral scientists in government multicultural policies, and the nature of possible ethnic group responses to such policies for cultural maintenance and : State University of New York Press.

The authors address topics of acculturation and the development and socialization of ethnic minorities--particularly Mexican-Americans. They stress the roles of social and behavioral scientists in government multicultural policies, and the nature of possible ethnic group responses to such policies for cultural maintenance and adaptation.

Using written sources and numerous interviews, she invokes gender, generation, class, religion, language, and the dramatic political changes of the s in South Asia and the United States to show how individual and group perceptions of ethnic identity have changed among Punjabi Mexican Americans in rural California.Abstract.

We test whether the effect of English proficiency differs between Hispanic and non-Hispanic immigrants. Using U.S. Census microdata on immigrants who arrived before we relate labor market, education, marriage, fertility and location of residence variables to their age at arrival in the U.S., and in particular whether that age fell within the "critical period" of .Hispanic families: Major differences between Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans (Fertility rates, consensual unions, assimilation, ethnic enclaves, etc.) Mexican Americans Racial-‐ethnic intermarriage -Which group has the highest rate?

.